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the region and with the world as china looks at, a sense of harmony, japan would be law, that sense of harmony and how you would achieve it is that their frustration is that the work is not just acquiescing to the notion that they are a rich country, that they are returning, that they're powerful, that they want respect. and they want to see the world kind of step back and give it greater latitude, but doesn't see this. this is what i think whether i personally think we are on a collision course. because when you look at what china's expectations of the world are, you also look at its paranoia, you look at jim, i'd love to hear utah, you're such an expert insider, what's going on in the cyber world. you see something which seems hard to me, despite her best efforts in not one to replace history, that the rise of a great power usually and often leads to messiness. usually and often leads to conflict. let's get some conversation from those of you who are thinking sisley that this is supposed to be a no-nonsense forum on military and secret strategy. i don't want you to predict war, bu
experience. he is a graduate of yale law school. he clerked for the conservative judge james buckley on the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit following graduation. so you have to ask why did it take seven months for the senate to finally after waiting seven months, we'll talk about it for 20 minutes, then we'll vote his nomination. why the seven-month delay? republican obstruction. now, after this vote, the senate remains backlogged with 17 judicial nominations that go back to before the august, the august recess. senate republicans are establishing another harmful precedent by refusing to proceed on judicial nominees with bipartisan support before the end of the session. they held up judicial nominees three years ago, they did it two years ago, they did it last year. now they are doing it again this year. they found a new way to employ their own trick of a pocket filibuster. they stalled nominees into the next year. and then they forced the senate in the new year to work on nominees from the past year. delay and delay and delay and push other confirmations back in time, then cut off
and moldova. once this bill is signed into law, our workers, job creators and farmers will be able to take full advantage of russia and moldova's ascension to the w.t.o. -- accession to the w.t.o. the bill citrus strong enforcement provisions to ensure that russia lives up to its international trade obligations. finally this bill will help advance human rights and the rule of law in russia. today's vote would not be possible without the combined efforts of many dedicated public servants. first i would like to thank the staff at the office of the u.s. trade representative. many of them toiled for years to bring russia and moldova into the w.t.o., often at great personal sacrifice. i also would like to take a moment to thank my colleagues for all of their hard work in helping to craft this bill. an open and transparent dialogue was critical to our success. i would particularly like to again express my appreciation to all the members of the finance committee who worked with me and my staff to develop a strong package to develop many of the concerns we all have concerning our bilateral trade r
. we have treated six subjects. economic restructuring and social policy, rule of law, transitional justice, security sector reform, a lack of assistance and constitution design. in each of those areas we provided recommendations to the transitional government. we have not laid out a template nor blueprint for the future. they are merely recommendations they hope the transitional government of syria will adopt. in addition to the work we've are begun, we are entering phase two, where we update the document. we incorporate feedback from syrians, particularly those inside the country and we issue a new person of the documents. vincent s-sierra overcapacity, let alone for several months have escalated to the point that now we have entirely new dynamics. within a day after, we do not address foreign policy issues. we do not address issues of foreign armed agents on the ground. we do with the security or reform. we call for dismantling of the opera system in syria, but we do call for a gradual debaathification as opposed to an immediate one within the government. >> what other members ad
that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing on. our democracy by islamist ideology. what shall we do about the threat to democracy the case arabs are going to sort their problems out. this is the first time they're focusing on their own homegrown problems gloominess and israelis and other people. what should we do about the ideology that is focusing on destruction of democracies? >> would anybody like to take out one? >> it begins by recognizing what it is. a couple of years ago before these tahrir square movement, there is a prominent article about my son brother had. the term moderate is a separate term because to us it means someone like ice. but in reality, all it defines as the position in a given political context. there were moderate. overseer was a moderate not be,
's subservient to a civilian leadership. how do you build military that values rule of law? that values human rights? calculate that into an organizational construct in its training. we can add value in the areas, and we're prepared to do that. >> time for two more, justin and christina. >> thanks, justin with fox news. i wanted to ask you about the strategic shift to the region, are you concerned that this shift could be considered premature considering there are still real problems in the middle east if you look at syria where u.s. is at risk, a serious conflict there with the chemical weapons, obviously, real concerns about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done in the middle east? >> well, i would go back to the president's strategy on this, and take a look at it that didn't say we'd shift everything we have in the military or in the government into the asia pacific. it prioritized the asia pacific, but it talked about an enduring requirement to be in a present and security role in the middle east as well. you know, we're talking about, i think, a near term perspectiv
it is not for real world deficit reduction. it is. does it mean that it's better than the current law? maybe not. but there is an agreement that in the fiscal cliff is not the best way. >> we could add the baseline. the deficit to gdp. >> you said the deficit. >> you look at the current line baseline and get under 1% of deficit to gdp. >> seven years and 7 trillion of debt reduction. if anybody wants to read more about, please look at that space on what it takes. i thank you all for being here today. one reason we have to end it is that these people are going to be so instrumental in getting us out of this mess that we have to get them back to work. >> , come thank you. [applause] >> more about the impact of the fiscal cliff coming about as the joint chief of staff >> i think the writers institute is very important that in the culture. we are a culture of words, of the voices. the words are key to our imagination and a capacity to envision things. we ourselves are tied to print on the page. but i think there is no other art form so readily accessible that is something in literature and the just
that the electoral law allows for them residing outside of the country to vote. working in collaboration with organizations such as the office of the high commissioner for the refugees that speaks with displaced persons and refugees the government could take steps to allow the significant population of refugees in the neighboring countries and the internally displaced persons to hold the region's. at the same time, as logistically challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their pr
must be vigilant by fully comply current laws and regulations, and by a many sanctions is needed to close the loopholes. i hope that legislation is currently pending in the congress makes it way through rapidly and will do just that. regarding energy, sanctions are an essential tool and our continued attempt to isolate the iranian regime. however, we have to recognize that for many countries in the subcommittee's jurisdiction, decreasing consumption of iranian energy means increasing consumption of russian energy. such a chain reaction is not in a national interest of the united states. the solution to this problem requires renewed american leadership or partnership to increase the development of resources that lag across the south caucasus. and central asia as well as the infrastructure, the pipelines and other things needed to transport these resources. i would also like to elaborate a little bit more about bahrain. we have some people on the panel today that we will ask questions about bahrain. and they have some intimate knowledge of some of the problems that have taken place
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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